Volume 9 Issue 4 March 2011

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https://doi.org/10.33697/ajur.2011.001

Editorial: “The Most Terrifying Problem in American University Education…”

https://doi.org/10.33697/ajur.2011.002

Author(s):

C. C. Chancey

Affiliation:

University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa 50614-0150 USA


Investigation of the Effect of Concentration on Molecular Aggregation of Cyanine Dyes in Aqueous Solution

https://doi.org/10.33697/ajur.2011.003

Author(s):

John Kunzler, Leen Samha, Renwu Zhang, and Hussein Samha

Affiliation:

Department of Physical Science, Southern Utah University, Cedar City, Utah 84720 USA

ABSTRACT:

The aggregation of the cyanine dye, 3,3’-disulfobutyl-5,5’-dichloro thiacarbocyanine triethylamine, (NK-3796) in aqueous solution was investigated using absorption and emission spectroscopy. The equilibrium, n(monomer) ⇆ n(dimer) ⇆ (H-aggregate)n , was observed over a series of dye concentrations ranging from 10-4 mM to 0.1mM. At concentrations <10-3 mM, the dye exists in solution mostly in the monomeric form. However, dimers become more significant when the concentration of the dye exceeds 10-2 mM. Unlike the substituted dye in the 9th position, the NK-3796 dye tends to form H-aggregates at higher concentration (>10-1 mM). Monomers and dimers exhibit strong emission in the visible region. Also notable, is that the emission from the H-aggregates was very weak due to self quenching.


An Interruption in the Highway: New Approach to Modeling Car Traffic

https://doi.org/10.33697/ajur.2011.004

Author(s):

Amin Rezaeezadeh

Affiliation:

Physics Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran

ABSTRACT:

A very common phenomenon in car traffic is investigated in this article. The problem is one-dimensional. We find the wave equation of the traffic, and illustrate a simulation using Matlab 7.6


Design Optimization for DNA Nanostructures

https://doi.org/10.33697/ajur.2011.005

Author(s):

Jacob Girard, Andrew Gilbert, Daniel Lewis, and Mary Spuches

Affiliation:

Department of Mathematics, Saint Michael’s College, One Winooski Park, Colchester, Vermont 05439 USA

ABSTRACT:

This paper is concerned with minimizing the cost of self-assembling DNA nanostructures by minimizing the number of different components used in the construction. We first describe the nanostructures, then give a combinatorial formalization of the assembly process and demonstrate that the octet truss provides an accurate geometric framework for current branched junction molecule assembly. We choose the octet truss because it is highly symmetric and has an appropriate number of edges for the application. We develop a method of differentiating among branched junction molecules, the basic building blocks of the nanostructures, within this structure. In the mathematical model, we represent the branched junction molecules graphically with „tiles‟. We use this approach to find the minimum number of tiles necessary to construct Platonic and Archimedean solids naturally occurring within the octet truss. This will be useful and cost efficient for the chemists and biologists who actually build these branched junction molecules because once a branched junction molecule is created, a lab can make many copies of it.