Volume 9 Issues 2 and 3 September/December 2010

1
0

0
0
0

https://doi.org/10.33697/ajur.2010.011

Editorial: Science makes the pie bigger

https://doi.org/10.33697/ajur.2010.012

Author(s):

C. C. Chancey

Affiliation:

University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa 50614-0150 USA


Forensic Identification of Salvia divinorum and Salvinorin A

https://doi.org/10.33697/ajur.2010.013

Author(s):

Dana Nontell and Douglas Armstrong

Affiliation:

Department of Physical Sciences, Olivet Nazarene University, Bourbonnais, IL 6091

ABSTRACT:

Salvia divinorum is a member of the mint family that is growing in popularity in the United States and many other countries as a hallucinogenic drug. Because of this, numerous studies have been conducted in identifying the plant material. Some of the most common methods include UV/Vis, TLC, and GC/MS. This article discusses these methods, as well as two other common identification methods proven to be ineffective towards salvia. An extraction method is also discussed.


Odor and the Effects of Schema Activation on Recognition Memory

https://doi.org/10.33697/ajur.2010.014

Authors and Affiliations:

Kelly Appino, Claire Svec, Brandon Tankard, Amy A. Overman
Department of Psychology, Elon University, Elon, North Carolina 27244, USA

Joseph D. W. Stephens
Department of Psychology, North Carolina A & T State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411 USA

ABSTRACT:

This study investigated whether schema-consistent odors affect recognition memory. Forty-two undergraduate students read a story about baking in the presence of an odor that was either baking-related (schema-consistent) or not (schema-inconsistent). Further, the story contained information that was both inconsistent, and consistent, with baking. Participants were then tested on recognition of information from the story. It was predicted that participants who smelled the schema-consistent odor would be more likely to falsely recognize new (i.e., not in the story) schema-consistent information than those who smelled the schema-inconsistent odor. The results indicated that all participants were more likely to falsely recognize new schema-consistent information than schema-inconsistent information. However, odor had no statistically significant effects on recognition.


Longitudinal Light Clock and Zeno’s Paradox

https://doi.org/10.33697/ajur.2010.015

Author(s):

Joshua Fixelle and K. Austin Johnson

Affiliation:

Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, Abington, 1600 Woodland Road, Abington, Pennsylvania 19001, USA

ABSTRACT:

Introductory college text books consider time dilation through the derivation of the transverse light clock. We consider the case of the longitudinal light clock and derive the time dilation formula of special relativity. Our methods yield the same result as derived by the transverse light clock, and help explain the concept of failure of simultaneity.


Metal Ion Concentration within Algal Tissue of Species Growing in Proximity to Tioga River Outflows Affected by Acid Mine Drainage in Northern Pennsylvania

https://doi.org/10.33697/ajur.2010.016

Author(s):

Cheyenne McKibbin, Kyle Root, and Gregory Carson

Affiliation:

Department of Chemistry and Physics, Mansfield University, Mansfield, Pennsylvania 16933 USA

ABSTRACT:

In this study, two species of algae from two different areas impacted by acid mine drainage (AMD) were analyzed for metal ion accumulation. The two species of algae collected were Klebsormidium and Entransia. Both algal species are located in an area of high metal ion concentrations and low pH (ranging from 2.28 to 2.89). The study assessed the concentration of iron, manganese, zinc, copper and nickel in the algal tissue. Data shows that both Entransia and Klebsormidium are absorbing or adsorbing iron selectively.


The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase NARF Promotes Colony Formation in vitro and Exhibits Enhanced Expression Levels in Glioblastoma Multiforme in vivo

https://doi.org/10.33697/ajur.2010.017

Author(s):

Tucker W. Anderson, Christopher Wright, and William S. Brooks

Affiliation:

Department of Biology, Freed-Hardeman University, Henderson, Tennessee

ABSTRACT:

The ubiquitin ligase NARF is a newly identified protein belonging to a small family of structurally similar E3 proteins. NARF is a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt-β-catenin pathway, targeting TCF/LEF family members for proteolytic degradation through poly-ubiquitination. We examined the role that NARF plays in cell division and found that overexpression of NARF in a colony forming assay increases colony formation in a RING finger-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that NARF transcripts are expressed at a higher level in the grade IV brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme as compared with low grade astrocytomas. Our data thus indicate that NARF is a positive regulator of cell growth and may be involved in the tumorigenic process.


The Development of a Three-Dimensional Material Point Method Computer Simulation Algorithm for Bullet Impact Studies

https://doi.org/10.33697/ajur.2010.018

Author(s):

M.J. Connolly, E. Maldonado and M.W. Roth

Affiliation:

Department of Physics, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa 50614-0150 USA

ABSTRACT:

The two-dimensional Material Point Method (MPM) algorithm outlined by Chen and Brannon has been extended to three dimensions. The development of the code is discussed as well as applications for simulating bullet impact on biological and non-biological systems.